Dover Dates, 1722-1922; A Bicentennial History of Dover, New Jersey, Published in Connection with Dover's Two Hundredth Anniversary Celebration Under the Direction of the Dover Fire Department, August 9, 10, 11, 1922

Dover Dates, 1722-1922; A Bicentennial History of Dover, New Jersey, Published in Connection with Dover's Two Hundredth Anniversary Celebration Under the Direction of the Dover Fire Department, August 9, 10, 11, 1922

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ... more quickly. To "miss the mail" in Bruce's time perhaps gave him little concern. The coming of plate and typesetting machines was to the newspaper office what a copious shower is to the parched soil. In 1870 The Iron Era, founded by Benjamin Vogt, also came into the journalistic life of the community. As a paying newspaper proposition The Era was perhaps the most successful until more recent years. During the regime of the late George Richards, who was recognized as one of the leading political factors of Northern Jersey, The Dover Printing Company was able to pay what was considered in those days a handsome dividend. At that time the late John S. Gibson was its editor, and it has been conceded that Editor Gibson was the ablest newspaper man of whom North Jersey can boast. Editor Gibson went from The Era office to The Newark C 0nimercialAdvertiser and from that time on the career of D0ver's strongest paper became more or less checkered. In the meantime Mr. Richards passed away in 1900, with some of those whose political patronage was necessarily withdrawn. In 1875 The Dover 'Index was founded by Francis F. Hummel and Lorenzo D. Tillyer, upon the discontinuance of The Dover Mail. Mr. Hummel came to Dover from Mauch Chunk in 1874 as foreman of The Mail, under Mr. Bruce. Both Mr. Hummel and Mr. Tillyer are now deceased, but, like Tennyson's brook, The Index goes on for ever. William G. Hummel, brother of the founder, is the present publisher. In the earlier days of journalism, newspapers had an ambition--for the most part political--more so than now, when profits are more to be desired than a principle fought for. The Era was the Republican mouthpiece and The Index the Democratic. So, on the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236853229
  • 9781236853226