The Domestic Encyclopedia, Or, a Dictionary of Facts and Useful Knowledge, Chiefly Applicable to Rural & Domestic Economy; With an Appendix, Containing Additions in Domestic Medicine, and the Veterinary and Culinary Arts Volume 1

The Domestic Encyclopedia, Or, a Dictionary of Facts and Useful Knowledge, Chiefly Applicable to Rural & Domestic Economy; With an Appendix, Containing Additions in Domestic Medicine, and the Veterinary and Culinary Arts Volume 1

List price: US$22.40

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1821 edition. Excerpt: ...he Voids the botts in his dung. For the cure of botts in the stomach, calomel should first be given in large quantities, and repeated at intervals. Then a purge. The botts, that many horses are troubled with, in the beginning of summar, are always seen on the straight gut, and are often thrown out with the dung and a yellowish matter. They are not dangerous in that part, though they render the horse restless. The season when they affect the animal is commonly in the months of May and June, after which they are rarely seen, as they do not continue with the horse above a fortnight or three weeks. Botts in the straight gut may be cured by giving the horse a. spoonful of savin, cut small, once or twice a day. in oats or bran moistened, to which may be added three or four cloves of garlic. The following aloetic purge should also be given at intervals: Fine socotrine aloes, ten drachms; fresh jalap, one drachm; aristolochia, or birthwort and myrrh powdered, of each two drachms; oil of savin and amber, of each one drachm; syrup of buckthorn, enough to form the whole into a ball. 00 Ia Mr Amiiisw Bii.i.nsos, ofPoughkeepsie, New York, has proved that botts are produced from the eggs deposited by a fly upon the hairs of horses. The fly is about the size of the honey-bee, and the head and neck not much unlike it. It flies with its head and body erect and perpendicular to the horizon, while its tail forms a sharp angle with their bodies, being bent. towards the horse, so that they touch the hair of his legs, or belly (which are the parts they most affect), only with the extremity of the tail, and in this way will fly about him for an hour, discharging a great number of eggs, which adhere to the ends of the hair. Mr. CI1ANCELnon LIVINGSTON observes, .show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 426 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 757g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236820460
  • 9781236820464