Domestic Art in Woman's Education; For the Use of Those Studying the Method of Teaching Domestic Art and Its Place in the School Curriculum

Domestic Art in Woman's Education; For the Use of Those Studying the Method of Teaching Domestic Art and Its Place in the School Curriculum

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...field is so very rich. The one teacher is cut and dried--the other type, ingenious, versatile, quick, and alert. She can accomplish much with little means because of the richness of this field of thought which she knows. Her main aim is the child, the good of the child or girl, to give that which is of most value to her in this phase of her education. This content of the thought side of the work has already been discussed under the analysis of the subject-matter. The following outlines may be suggestive for domestic-art courses, and serve to show the underlying thought content, the relation to local conditions as well as the possible relationship to other grade work. Outline II gives only the domestic-art phase of the industrial work for the lower grades. OUTLINE I Student Plan Course of Study for Grades 1-4, illustrating the use of many lines of hand-work, of which sewing forms a part. Local Conditions Location.--Rural school in northern New York. Instruction.--By grade teacher. Time.--Twenty minutes daily for class work, but children will have spare time during session and outside of school hours for completing work begun in class lesson. Materials.--The school board will furnish only drawing and manila paper. It is not interested in hand-work and will allow no appropriation for other materials. The people of the district have given no attention to the subject, so the teacher will have to interest the children sufficiently to have them contribute a little money for materials which will need to be bought, and to bring from home scraps of cloth, paper, etc., as they are needed in the work. The people are farmers and nearly every house will have abundance of pieces in the store-room. Most of them will also give the children a few cents at a time...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236587243
  • 9781236587244