The Dolmens of Ireland; Their Distribution, Structural Characteristics, and Affinities in Other Countries; Together with the Folk-Lore Attaching to Them; Supplemented by Considerations on the Anthropology, Ethnology, and Volume 1

The Dolmens of Ireland; Their Distribution, Structural Characteristics, and Affinities in Other Countries; Together with the Folk-Lore Attaching to Them; Supplemented by Considerations on the Anthropology, Ethnology, and Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...XXI. No. 14. Situated to the S. of XX, at the corner of the road (dolmencircle). "A few stones only remain. The rest, including the cromleac, have been displaced or removed by raising gravel."--P. "Only two stones half buried in a pit are now visible."--W. M. MS. " Letters," loc. cit.; R.S.M., pp. 42, 43. XXII. No. 15. Situated still more to the S., and on the E. side of the road (dolmen-circle). "This was a double circle, about 40 feet in diameter, but a portion of the outer one has been destroyed to raise gravel--17 stones only remaining. The cromleac is ruined. Human bones were found within it by Mr. Walker."--P. On excavation, the interment was found to be greatly disturbed. No vestige, save one stone, of the cist or its flooring remained. One of the first objects turned up was the bulbous portion of an instrument, almost the whole of which was afterwards discovered, formed of cetaceous bone, and nearly two feet long, which Col. Wood-Martin regards as a sword or stabbing rapier. A fragment of a second, but much smaller, dagger-like instrument was also found, and three blackened portions of a third. It is to be compared with a shuttle of whalebone figured in Boyesen's " Hist, of Norway," and Col. Wood-Martin thought that it might have been formed from a bone of a dead Greenland whale, drifted ashore at Cuilirra. The head of the larger instrument is like that of the fossilized bone one found in IV. "There were also found," during this excavation by Col. Wood-Martin, "a small fragment of flint, a diminutive white stone, a flake of fractured white quartz, a whitish-coloured egg-shaped stone, weighing i lb., fragments of shells of cockle, mussel, and of the genus Helix, 2...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236751736
  • 9781236751737