The Dogs of the British Islands; Being a Series of Articles on the Points of Their Various Breeds, and the Treatment of the Diseases to Which They Are Subject

The Dogs of the British Islands; Being a Series of Articles on the Points of Their Various Breeds, and the Treatment of the Diseases to Which They Are Subject

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...Salop, and Mr. Collier's from Culmstock, near Wellington. In the west, Mr. Cheriton and Mr. Mildmay also pursue the sport. The points of the otter hound are like those of the bloodhound, except as to the coat, which should be composed of hard and long hair, somewhat rough in its lying, and mixed with a short, woolly under-coat, which serves to keep the body warm even when wetted by long immersion. The colour differs also in not being confined to black-and-tan or tan--the former, however, being often met with, as in the case of Mr. Carriqk's Stanley, whose portrait accompanies this article. This dog is of a grizzled black-and-tan colour, and of a very fine shape both in head and body. He is by Mr. Carrick's Eingwood out of Harrison's Glory, and took several first prizes at Glasgow, Birmingham, and Nottingham in 1872-3. CHAPTER III. THE FOX TERRIER (SMOOTH AND ROUGH) AND THE DACHSHUND. THE SMOOTH POX TEREIER. ROM the very commencement of foxhunting in this country, small terriers were kept at each of the various kennels, for the purpose of bolting the 3(r) fox from his earth when run to ground by the hounds. Originally these dogs were for the most part black and tan in colour; but from this C cause they were so frequently mistaken for a fox when drawing a covert, that they were bred white or pied. The dogs used for bolting foxes by some of the most famous masters of hounds and their families for generations were similar to the old English terrier, and were many of them white, slightly wire-haired, and with no more of the bulldog in them than in the Italian greyhound, that cross malting them so savage as to kill rather than bolt the fox; they had plenty of pluck; their noses were sharp, and they were small enough to go to ground wherever a fox or.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579739
  • 9781236579737