The Doctrine and Practice, Relating to Inflammation and Its Various Consequences, Tumours, Aneurisms, Wounds, and the States Connected with Them

The Doctrine and Practice, Relating to Inflammation and Its Various Consequences, Tumours, Aneurisms, Wounds, and the States Connected with Them

By (author) 

List price: US$28.94

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1838 edition. Excerpt: ...so that the surrounding skin may even become puckered, or depressed. Some have imagined that the granulations never rose up to a level with the surrounding surface, but that the neighbouring skin, by a wasting of the subjacent cellular substance sunk to a level with the ulcerated surface. That this sinking, does in part take place, in many instances, I am not disposed to deny; but that it is a necessary, far less an exclusive way of effecting a level, I scarcely think it necessary to disprove. Mr. Hunter considers ulceration as a species of inflammation, which he calls the ulcerative inflammation. If we inquire a little farther as to the character of this inflammation, we find it to be resolved into that of absorption, which he calls progressive absorption, to distinguish it from interstitial. Several succeeding writers have adopted the same opinion, and given a kind of commentary upon it, doubtless, because they found it more easy to amplify than to investigate. Mr. Hunter describes the character of an ulcerating surface to be, that it is made up of little cavities, the edge of the skin is scolloped, thin, and overhangs the surface. The sore is foul, and the discharge thin; but, says he, when the ulceration stops, the edge becomes smooth, regular a little rounded, and purple, covered with semi-transparent white. It is quite evident, that Mr. Hunter's description of an ulcer is the description of a state very different from that which I would admit to be ulceration. His ulcerative inflammation is a process of destruction rather than of reparation; granulation forms no part of it, and I confess that I can see no essential difference between his ulceration and suppuration. It may, indeed, be said that a distinction may exist, from there being...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 206 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 376g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236543092
  • 9781236543097