The Distilleries Considered; In Their Connection with the Agriculture, Commerce, and Revenue of Britain Also in Their Effects Upon the Health, Tranqui

The Distilleries Considered; In Their Connection with the Agriculture, Commerce, and Revenue of Britain Also in Their Effects Upon the Health, Tranqui

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1797 edition. Excerpt: ...of every one who attends our public hospitals. But above all the distinguishing and unequivocal effectswhich mark the danger of fermented liquors to the human frame, the gout is the most common, certain, and dreadful. The immoderate use of all kinds of wine is known to incorporate this distemper into the, very constitution, which entails misery for generations upon the human race; and the constant ingurgitation of porter and strong ale often produces the fame effects: But I believe there can scarcely be produced one instance, wherein a man, who madeuse of malt spirits diluted, for his constant, ordinary, ar convivial drink, to whatever excess almost he indulged himself, was afflicted with a settled gout, or even any goutifli complaints at all, excepting such were hereditary in his family. From this decided circumstance, it may bear a question, if our doughty wine-bibers, mould they drink less wine, and add a little malt spirits now and then, would not find effects similar to what is experienced by our drinkers of ale; they might, indeed, be drunk sooner, but would possibly be safer: And I think it happy for their health, that it is become fashionable to substitute a tumbler of tody after supper, instead of wine. Might they not thereby be redeemed from the terrors which mix with their conviviality, the terrors of blue flannel, crutches, and premature old age? I have been frequently amused with hearing some persons strongly recommend porter and ale as a drink peculiarly fit for the labouring people, in preference to spirits, on account of some supposed nutritive quality, of which, they say, these liquors are posiesied. It is in this manner opinions are often formed, upon mere conjecture. I am sure there is no medical person, accustomed to analise...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236682521
  • 9781236682529