Dissertations on the Question How Far Are the External Means of Exploring the Condition of the Internal Organs to Be Considered Useful and Important in Medical Practice?; For Which Premiums Were Adjudged by the Boylston Medical Committee

Dissertations on the Question How Far Are the External Means of Exploring the Condition of the Internal Organs to Be Considered Useful and Important in Medical Practice?; For Which Premiums Were Adjudged by the Boylston Medical Committee

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...in its latent form, and the return of cold weather brings with it the former and almost forgotten train of symptoms. The sonorous and sibilant rales are but seldom heard, for the tumefaction of the mucous lining has much diminished, and they are replaced by the mucous rattle consequent upon the secretion which now occupies the bronchial branches. Respiration is rarely suspended, for reasons which may be gathered from the last remark; it is diminished however, and may recur again but a moment after, as we have already explained. Occasionally it is observed to be puerile in a very great degree, while at the same time the patient may labor under a most disagreeable sense of suffocation. This condition of the respiratory function is remarkable; the instrument would lead us to believe that it is performed in its most perfect manner, but the sensations of the patient induce him to think that it is about to cease perhaps forever. "An increase in the necessity for respiration," are the words which Laennec uses to explain the phenomenon. The appearances of the sputa in the acute form have been related; they now become less viscous, more opaque, sometimes greyish, from a partial admixture with the black matter of the glands; but more frequently white and puriform. This is one of the forms of asthma. Pituitary Catarrh, is characterized by nearly the same physical signs as the variety of which we have spoken; the tumefaction of the mucous membrane is not so great, and hence arises the little difference which is found to occur. The chest resounds well, and the sibilant and sonorous rales are recognized; respiration is not often suspended although it may be diminished, and why it should be thus is obvious. When the disease begins to yield, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 92 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236827783
  • 9781236827784