Dissertations Sixth; Exhibiting a General View of the Progress of Mathematical and Physical Science Principally from 1775 to 1850

Dissertations Sixth; Exhibiting a General View of the Progress of Mathematical and Physical Science Principally from 1775 to 1850

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ...in one and the same medium. Of the last of these doctrines I shall speak in the next section in connection with the discoveries of Malus. With respect to the former I may here observe that it gives the only satisfactory explanation of the primary difficulty of the undulatory hypothesis, --namely, that a beam of light admitted by a hole in a screen pursues a rectilinear course afterwards, instead of spreading sideways, as do waves in water, and waves of sound. Huygens shows, on elementary and convincing principles, that the lateral impressions of the wave are rapidly extinguished by the want of concurrence of the impulses which they communicate to the ether. This is necessarily true when the breadth of the aperture is such as to exceed vastly the length of a wave; and such is always the case with light, but rarely in any other instance. It is, in short, only immediately in front of the aperture that the disturbances originating in every part of the front of the original wave embraced within the aperture, concur in producing an accordant movement on the ether. (455.) This principle, more fully stated, by which every The prin-luminiferous disturbance of the ether is considered 'li'miaens he J8ult811t of all the pre-existing disturbances to which it is due, constitutes what is sometimes called the principle of Huygens, of which I shall have more to say hereafter. (456.) Neither at the time of its publication, nor for Newton's more than a century afterwards, was the value of the n'aturo" nese reasonings understood. It would be beside of light. our present object to discuss Newton's opinions; but it is too certain that he did not allow Huygens' arguments on the undulatory nature of light to have any weight with him. Not that he was averse (as is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 194 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236540158
  • 9781236540157