A Dissertation on the Numbers of Mankind in Antient and Modern Times. with an Appendix, Containing Remarks on Mr. Hume's Political Discourse, of the Populousness of Antient Nations

A Dissertation on the Numbers of Mankind in Antient and Modern Times. with an Appendix, Containing Remarks on Mr. Hume's Political Discourse, of the Populousness of Antient Nations

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1753 edition. Excerpt: ... were afterwards in times of luxury; for while simplicity remained, the masters lived in greater familiarity with their slaves, and of course treated them with more gentleness. This is confirmed by Seneca with respect to the Romans; That sanctity of manners, for which they were so remarkable before the Carthaginian wars, was inconsistent with barbarity towards their slaves. What our author f has quoted from Demosthenes, shews how gently they were treated by the AtheY nians. Ne illnd quidem videtis; qaam omnem invidiam majores nostri dominis, omnem contumeliam servis detfaxerint? dominum, patrem familiae appellaverunt: servos (quod etiam in mimis adhuc durat) familiares. Instituerunt diem festum, quo non solum cum servis domini vescerentur; fed quo utique honores illis in domo gerere, jus dicere permisernnt, et domum pusillam rem publicam effe judicaverunt. Seneca, epul 47. t P. -7-. mans. Tacitus takes notice of the lenity of the Germans; and it is probable the case was the fame in most other antient nations. The severe and rigorous treatment of this inferior order of men, seems to have prevailed only among the Romans, in the more degenerate times of their commonwealth, and during their monarchy. 'Tis from those corrupted ages of Rome that Mr. Hume has brought all his examples of the barbarous usage of slaves, except one; and this one, viz. the inhuman practice, among the Greeks, of expiscating the truth by the torture of slaves, will be found to make little for his purpose; for this practice was not confined to flaves'. freemen were not exempted, where it was necessary, or other evidence could not be got: 'tis certain, at any rate, that it could not be frequent, as few cafes would require it. Nay, in this respect, have modern times any...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236513266
  • 9781236513267