A Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, Or, the Great Gods of Phenicia, Samothrace, Egypt, Troas, Greece, Italy, and Crete; Being an Attempt to Deduce the Several Orgies of Isis, Ceres, Mithras, Bacchus, Rhea, Adonis, and Volume 2

A Dissertation on the Mysteries of the Cabiri, Or, the Great Gods of Phenicia, Samothrace, Egypt, Troas, Greece, Italy, and Crete; Being an Attempt to Deduce the Several Orgies of Isis, Ceres, Mithras, Bacchus, Rhea, Adonis, and Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1803 edition. Excerpt: ...Hewrcus m. The Hippian Castor, and in arms renown'd The blameless Pollux, to Olympian Jove Fair Leda bore. These, when the foaming waves In mountains rife, urg'd by the wintery blast, Protection to the mariner afford. Soon as they come, winnowing the buxom air With golden pinions, straight the burly winds Are hufli'd in silence; and the wild uproar, Of breakers dashing on the whiten'd beach, Is heard no longer. Montfaucon mentions a curious monument dug up near Este, representing a vow performed to the Dioscori, by Argenidas the son of Aristogenidas; in consequence, as one might imagine, of his having escaped the perils of shipwreck. The deities are carved standing upon a pedestal, while Argenidas is offering to them two paterae upon an altar, the lower part of which exhibits a hog in bass-relief. In the back ground is a dismasted vessel floating upon the waves; and upon the land are four naked figures, which m Horn. Hymn, ad Dioscor. apappear to have just emerged from the water. Behind them is an Anacion, or temple of the AnaSles-Diofcori, as we may conclude from the Greek letters KEION yet remaining; and over the head of Argenidas is a serpent. The monument has so much suffered by the injuries of time, that the features both of the deities and their votary are entirely obliterated n. The hog, which here makes its appearance, is one of the arkite emblems, as is sufficiently evident from the histories of Adonis, Osiris, and the Vara Avatar; and the serpent is merely the accustomed symbol os the Sun. Hence we find, that, in allusion to the solar worship, the charioteers of Castor and Pollux were called Amphitus and Telchius0; the first of which names is Am-Phi, the oracular Sun; while the second is a corruption of Tel-Chin, the priest of the solar...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236504305
  • 9781236504302