A Dissertation on Miracles; Containing an Examination of the Principles Advanced by David Hume, Esq. in an Essay on Miracles with a Correspondence on the Subject by Mr. Hume, Dr. Campbell, and Dr. Blair, Now First Published. to Volume 1

A Dissertation on Miracles; Containing an Examination of the Principles Advanced by David Hume, Esq. in an Essay on Miracles with a Correspondence on the Subject by Mr. Hume, Dr. Campbell, and Dr. Blair, Now First Published. to Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1797 edition. Excerpt: ...be more characteristic of the Emperor, or could better show the arts he had recourse to, and the hold which flattery had of him; nothing could be more characteristic of the Alexandrians, the people amongst whom the miracle is said to have been wrought. Queis coelestis favor, et quaedam in Vespasianum inclinatio numinum ostenderetur. f Quern dedita superstitianibus gens ante alios colit, % Vocibus adulantium in spem induci. The persons, ' fays the essayist, from whose testimony he related the miracle, of established character for judgment and veracity, as we may well suppose; eye-witnesses of the fact, and confirming their verdict, after the Flavian family were despoiled of the empire, and could no longer give any reward as the price of a lie.' Persons of established character for judgment and veracity I Who told Mr Hume so?It was not Tacitus. He only denominates them in general: ' They who were pre sent, ' and ' a crowd of bystanders.' The author, conscious that he advances this without even the shadow of authority hais subjoined, in order to palliate the matter, as we may well suppose. An admirable expedient for supplying a weak plea, with those convenient circumstances that can give it strength! When fact fails, which is not seldom the case, we need but apply to supposition, whose help is always near. But if this be allowed to take the place of argument, I fee no reason why 1 may not avail myself of the privilege of supposing, as well as the author. The witnesses then, 1 will suppose, were mostly an ignorant rabble: But I wrong my cause; I have a better foundation than suppofal, having Tacitus himself, and all antiquity on my fide, when I add, deeply immersed in superstition, particularly attached to the worship of Sera/is, and keenly engaged in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236679326
  • 9781236679321