Disquisitions Upon the Painted Greek Vases and Their Probable Connection with the Shows of the Eleusionian Mysteries

Disquisitions Upon the Painted Greek Vases and Their Probable Connection with the Shows of the Eleusionian Mysteries

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1825 Excerpt: ...a man. Created by him for the purpose of lighting "the world, it obeys his word; and disperses every where its light, "as a candle throws its beams the moment it is lighted." To this it may be properly added, that the most ancient Osiris of the Egyptians, for there were many of the name, was I believe it to be the same work that is noticed by Father Giorgi, Alph. Tibet p. 94., as the production of the Capuchin missionaries in India. supposed to be the son of Vulcan, and was entitled Tosorthrus, a word that, according to Father Giorgif, signifies filiw fornacis, "the Son of the Furnace." Upon the whole, this interesting painting, taken from a very early Sicilian vase, which was once preserved in the library of the late James Edwards, Esq., but was destroyed by accident, furnishes a curious insight into the earliest religion of Greece, which evidently consisted of speculations upon, and probably a worship of, the mundane elements. This worship is also to be clearly traced in religious allegories upon works of art, in China and JapanJ; and it seems to have prevailed universally, before the first deification of heroes, who, in the course of time, were likened to those elements. "Plures fuerunt in Egypto Reges Osirides; quorum primus a Bonjurio, sta"tuitur Tosorthrus, filius Necher-Ophis Vulcani, omniumque Egyptiorum Regum "antiquissimi."--Alphabet. Tibetan. p. 71. f M Tosorthrus hie idem esse possettanquam'+oTfOTEp-'Jpai Touser-thro, "et Graeca terminatione Tousorthros, filius fornacis, sive Vulcani filius.--f-enim "articulus fcemineus ideo praefigitur, quia pCtt fornax generis est foeminei."--Ibid. p. 75. % The Chinese imagined two principles which they termed Yang and Yn, and they represented them by...
show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1130999742
  • 9781130999747