The Discovery of the Empire of Guiana, with a Relation of the Great and Golden City of Manoa; Edited with Copious Explanatory Notes and a Biograph. Memoir by R. H. Schomburgk

The Discovery of the Empire of Guiana, with a Relation of the Great and Golden City of Manoa; Edited with Copious Explanatory Notes and a Biograph. Memoir by R. H. Schomburgk

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ...Indians, we would tell him topuremacka, ' make them pleased' (or rather them make pleased). The analogy of these and other words is not merely accidental, but proves that the Macusis, or at least a branch of that tribe, formerly inhabited the Orinoco. They now live on the savannahs of the Rupununi and Rio Branco or Parima. called Caiama1, of some fiue or sixe miles in length, and the next day arriued at the mouth of Caroli, when we were short of it as low or further downe as the port of Morequito we heard the 1 This island is now named Faxardo; it is about ten miles long, and lies in the Orinoco right before the mouth of the river Caroni. The island was formerly fortified, and a battery which Don Manuel Centurion erected about 1770 on the eastern point commanded both banks of the river. To judge from Keymis's relation, the Spaniards possessed fortifications on this island as early as 1596. 2 The river Caroni is one of the largest tributaries which the Orinoco receives from the Sierra Parima. Its chief branch, the Yuruani, has its sources on the mountain Ayangcatsibang (literally, "Louse-comb mountain," from the jagged appearance of its mural precipice); the Cukenam, which joins the Yuruani, falls from the mountain Cukenam or Icukenama; from the point of junction of these two rivers, it is called Caroni. A short distance from its confluence with the Orinoco is the great cataract, or Salto, celebrated for its picturesque scenery. The river is said to fall over a bar from fifteen to twenty feet high. According to the description which Father Caulin gives of it, the noise of the cararact is heard at a distance of several leagues. Diego de Ordaz found in 1531-32 at the mouth of the Caroni a settlement called Caroao or Carao, which...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236975332
  • 9781236975331