Discourses on Prophecy, in Which Are Considered Its Structure, Use, and Inspiration; Being the Substance of Twelve Sermons Preached in the Chapel of Lincolns Inn, in the Lecture Founded by Will. Warburton, Bishop of Gloucester

Discourses on Prophecy, in Which Are Considered Its Structure, Use, and Inspiration; Being the Substance of Twelve Sermons Preached in the Chapel of Lincolns Inn, in the Lecture Founded by Will. Warburton, Bishop of Gloucester

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ...But both the prophecy and miracle require some further attention. Read the history of the Assyrian invasion, and you will see it was not of common warfare, in the mere lust of conquest. The Invader made it his boast, "that he would confound the God who was known and worshipped at Jerusalem with the defeated idols and divinities of Polytheism, whose local tutelary name had been no defence against the power of his arms. His defiance is that of Infidelity and Irreligion more than the vaunt of ordinary aggression. He sent to reproach and blaspheme the Holy One of Israel. The vindication of God's own name, and the truth of his Revealed Religion, were in question. It was a case something similar to that of Egypt; and the prophet Isaiah has plainly suggested the comparison of the two 'f. Hence the evident fitness of the miraculous interposition. According to the original prediction of Ahijah, and given at the beginning of the kingdom, "The Lord shall root up Israel out of this "land; and shall scatter them beyond the river." I Kings, xv. 15. t Isaiah xxxvii. 33, 35. This unequal distribution of fortune between the two kingdoms is a fact in their history which scepticism itself must admit. It forms a broad indisputable record, which it would be idle to go about to prove; but it is no more than the previous state of prophecy required. For prophecy had pledged its word for the preservation of Judah beyond the fall of Samaria, and specifically from the Assyrians. Yet greater kingdoms than either of these had fallen under the Assyrian arms; and thetwo countries lay together, equally exposed. There was scarcely a natural line of separation between them; but it seems there was a wall of fire in the warrant of prophecy. Admit the prophecy, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236630823
  • 9781236630827