Digest of Insurance Cases; Embracing All Decisions in Any Manner Affecting Insurance Companies or Their Contract Upon Whatever Plan or for Whatever Pu

Digest of Insurance Cases; Embracing All Decisions in Any Manner Affecting Insurance Companies or Their Contract Upon Whatever Plan or for Whatever Pu

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...after the time fixed for payment of the assessment, will be held to be waived. Shea v. Massachusetts Ben. Association (Mass. S. J. C), 35 Northeastern Reporter (Jan. 26, 1894), p. 855; 23 Insurance Law Journal, 214. Insurable Interest--Rule.--Insurable interest is not necessary to entitle a beneficiary designated by the member of a benevolent society to receive the money as against creditors. Same--Same.--A fund contributed by the members of a fire department relief association by the payment of a certain sum by each member, as a gratuity from the association, is not analogous to the proceeds of an ordinary policy of insurance, or of a membership in a beneficial organization, which authorizes the beneficiary to receive a gross sum out of the treasury, but is a gift from each member, and is payable to the beneficiary designated by the by-laws of the association, without regard to whether the latter has an insurable interest in the life of the diseased. In re Zinn's Estate (Pa. D. Ct.), 2 Pa. Dist. R. 801. Statute--Corporations of First Class--Charter.--This certificate contained the seven statements required by Act Pa. April 29, 1874, and nothing more. Held, that the seven statements required by the act would be sufficient if the corporation belonged to the second class, for these, with the provisions of the law relating to such corporations read into its charter, would form a complete constitution. Corporations of the first class, however, have nothing in common with each other, excepting only this feature, that they are not organized for private profit, and their funds are held in trust for some specified purpose. Consequently the rights of the corporators, as between themselves, must be defined. Same--Same--Res Judicata.--Cases decided under...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 106 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 204g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236588185
  • 9781236588180