A Digest of the Decisions of the Courts of Last Resort of the Seveal States, from the Earliest Period [1760] to the Year 1888, Contained in the One Hundred and Sixty Volumes of the American Decisions and the American Reports, and Volume 3

A Digest of the Decisions of the Courts of Last Resort of the Seveal States, from the Earliest Period [1760] to the Year 1888, Contained in the One Hundred and Sixty Volumes of the American Decisions and the American Reports, and Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ... for conspiracy to defame and injure a person in his vocation. Wildee -. MeKee, 56 R. 271. Tlte following words were held actionable per te: Saying of a drover, whose business it is to purchase cattle, drive them to market, and sell them, that he is a bankrupt. Lewis v. Hawley, 2 D. 121. To say of a blacksmith, in relation to his trade and business, "He keeps false books, and I can prove it." Burtch v. Nichrton, 8 D. 390. Falsely and maliciously to say of a farmer that he is not able to pay his debts, that he owes more than he is worth, and that those whom he owed had better push him, or they would lose. Pliillips v. Hafer, 44 D. 111. Falsely and maliciously calling a justice of the peace "a damned fool of a justice." Spiering v. Andras, 30 R. 744. 2. Illustrations.--The declaration stated that the defendant, with intention to injure the reputation of the plaintiff as a merchant, falsely and maliciously spoke of him, then being a merchant, the following words: "Mr. Young, I must tell you that you have received more tobacco than you have accounted for to the house," meaning the mercantile house of which the plaintiff and defendant were partners. No colloquium was laid. Held, that these words were clearly actionable, as importing a charge against the plaintiff in his mercantile character. Hoyle v. Young, 1 D. 446. Defendant, in speaking about G., a justice of the peace, who had decided a case tried before him against defendant, said "G. perjured himself in deciding the suit against me, contrary to all law and evidence, etc. It is the damnedest erroneous decision I ever saw any justice give; it was a damned outrage, and was done for spite." Held, that the words imported that plaintiff violated his...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 900 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 45mm | 1,574g
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123649136X
  • 9781236491367