A Dictionary of Quotations from the English Poets

A Dictionary of Quotations from the English Poets

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... contemplation he, and valour form'd; For softness she, and sweet attractive grace. lb. iv. 29." Hail, wedded love! mysterious law Of human offspring. Milton, P. L. iv. 750. As spiders never seek the fly, But leave him, of himself, t' apply, So men are by themselves employ'd To quit the freedom they enjoy'd, And run their necks into a noose, They'd break 'em after to get loose. Butler, Hud. 3, I. 63. When men upon their spouses sciz'd, And freely marry'd where they pleas'd; They ne'er forswore themselves, nor lied, Nor, in the mind they were in, died; Nor took the pains t'address and sue, Nor play'd the masquerade to woo: And when they had them at their pleasure, They talk'd of love and flames at leisure. Butler, Ep. to his Lady, 239. Women first were made for men, Not men for them. It follows, then, That men have right to every one, And they no freedom of their own; And therefore men have power to choose But they no charter to refuse. Butler, Ep. to his Lady, 273. MARRIAGE, MATRIMONY. MARRIAGE, VA.TR.mOXY-continued. Though women first were made for men, Vet men were made for them agen: For when, out-witted by his wife. Man first turn'd tenant but for life, If woman had not interven'd How soon had mankind had an end! lb. Lady's Answer, 244. When I am old, and weary of the world, I may grow desperate, and take a wife To mortify withal. Otway. Who wed wuh fools, indeed, lead happy lives; Fools are the fittest, finest things for wives: Yet old men profit bring, as fools bring ease, And both make youth and wit much better please. Olway, Soldier's Fortune. When you would give all worldly plagues a name, Worse than they have already, call 'em wife! But a new married wife's a teeming mischief, Full of herself: why, what a deal of horror Has...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 567g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236942388
  • 9781236942388