A Dictionary of Psychological Medicine; Giving the Definition, Etymology and Synonyms of the Terms Used in Medical Psychology with the Symptoms, Treatment, and Pathology of Insanity and the Law of Lunacy in Great Britain and Volume 1

A Dictionary of Psychological Medicine; Giving the Definition, Etymology and Synonyms of the Terms Used in Medical Psychology with the Symptoms, Treatment, and Pathology of Insanity and the Law of Lunacy in Great Britain and Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...clearly to discriminate between persons and patients (or cases) was the source of no inconsiderable error in the minds of the readers of those reports. In cases of paroxysmal or recurrent insanity, a person is frequently both admitted to, and discharged recovered from, a hospital more than once in the course of an official year. In the numerical report of these recoveries there is no intimation that the number of persons is not equal to that of recoveries. At the Bloomingdale Asylum, New York, woman was discharged recovered six times, and one at the Worcester Hospital seven times in one year; and in neither instance was the reader informed.that the number of persons was not identical with that of cases recovered. Recoveries are also multiplied by the reported cures of the same person in more than one year. Thus, the woman who, at Worcester, made seven recoveries in one year, had been discharged recovered nine times within.the next two preceding years, making sixteen recoveries in the three years; and the woman who, at Bloomingdale, recovered six times in one year, was reported recovered forty-six times in the course of her life, and finally died, a raving maniac, in the asylum. At five American asylums forty persons were reported recovered four hundred and eighty-four times, or an average of a fraction more than ten recoveries for each person. The records of American hospitals contain the medical history of three women who were admitted as patients an aggregate of one hundred and eighteen times, and were discharged recovered one hundred and two times, and yet two of them died insane, and the third, when last heard from, had found a home apparently for life, in an almshouse. By new statistical tables, adopted in Massachusetts in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 520 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 27mm | 916g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236792769
  • 9781236792761