A Dictionary of the Natural History of the Bible; Or, a Description of All the Quadrupeds, Birds, Fishes, Reptiles, and Insects, Trees, Plants, Flowers, Gums and Precious Stones, Mentioned in the Sacred Scriptures. Collected from the Best

A Dictionary of the Natural History of the Bible; Or, a Description of All the Quadrupeds, Birds, Fishes, Reptiles, and Insects, Trees, Plants, Flowers, Gums and Precious Stones, Mentioned in the Sacred Scriptures. Collected from the Best

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ...must have been of osier, which, as we learn from Columella, was the principal of the wicker kind. It is certain, that not only baskets, but boats were made originally of such twigs, and particularly of osier66; and even those which were externally covered with skins, had ribs of that wood on account of its pliability67. On the other hand, the learned Mr. Fuller, in his Miscellanies, 1. iv. c. 5, has shewn that the wood of which the ark was built, was undoubtedly that which the Greeks call Kiirctpi(t(Toc, or the cypress; for, taking away the termination, kupar and gopher differ very little in sound. The affinity of the letters 3 and 3, G and c, strengthens the resemblance. This observation, the great Bochart has confirmed, and shewn very plainly, that no country abounds so much with this wood as that part of Assyria which lies about Babylon. Cocquius, Phytologia Sacra, p. 125; and Celsius, Hierobotan. V. i. p. 329, very learnedly support and confirm this interpretation. GOURD. I. P'p'p KIKIUn. Occurs Jonah iv. 6, 7, 9, 10, only. It is difficult to determine what was the plant which grew up suddenly, and made a shelter to the prophet Jonah. The Author of " Scripture Illustrated," p. 190, says: " The gourd of Jonah should be no trivial lesson to theological disputants. So long ago as the days of Jerom and Augustine, those pious fathers differed as to what the plant was; and they not only differed in words, but from words they proceeded to blows; and Jerom wasaccused of heresy at Rome by Augustine. Jerom thought this plant was an ivy, and pleaded the authority of Aquila, Symmachus, Theodotion, and others: Augustine thought it was a gourd, and he was supported by the Seventy, the Syriac, the Arabic, &c. etc. Had either of them...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 208 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 381g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236515994
  • 9781236515995