A Dictionary of the English Language; In Which the Words Are Deduced from Their Originals, Explained in Their Different Meanings and Authorized by the Names of the Writers in Whose Works They Are Found in Two Volumes to Volume . 1

A Dictionary of the English Language; In Which the Words Are Deduced from Their Originals, Explained in Their Different Meanings and Authorized by the Names of the Writers in Whose Works They Are Found in Two Volumes to Volume . 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1828 edition. Excerpt: ...not with a clear perception. Milton. 2. Not brightly; not luminously. Boyle. DI'MMING. /. Obscurity. Shakspeare. DI'MNESS. s. from dim. I. Dulness of sight 3. Want of apprehension; stupidity. Decay of Piety. 3. Obscurity; not brightness. DI1HPLE. s. dint, a hole; dintle, a little hole. Skinner. Cavity or depression in the cheek or chin. Grew. To Dl'MPLE. v. n. from the noun To sink in small cavities. Dryden. Dl'MPLED. a. from dimple. Set with dimples. Sliakspeare. Dl'MPLY. a. from dimple Full of dimples. Warton. DIN. s. oyn, a noise, Sax. A loud noise; a violent and continued sound. Smith. To DIN. v. a. from the noun. 1. To stun with noise. Otway. 2. To impress with violent and continued noise. Swift. To DINE. v. n. diner, Ft. To eat the chief meal about the middle of the day. Clarend. To DINE. v. a. To give a dinner to; to feed. Dryden. DINE'TICAL. a. from Sin). Whirling round; vertiginous. Ray. To DING.w. a. pret. dung, dringen, Dutch. 1. To dash with violence. 3. To impress with force. To DING. v. a. To bluster; to bounce; to hull." A low word. Arbuthnof. DING-DONG. s. A word by which the sound of bells is imitated. Shakspeare. Dl'NGINESS. The quality of being brownish. DI'NCLE. s. from ben, a hollow. A hollow between hills. Milton. DI'NCLE-DANGLE. Any thing carelessly pendent. TVarton. Dl'NCy. a. bumg, Sax. Dark brown; dun; dirty. Ellis. Pl'NING-ROOM. s. dine and room. The apartment of the house where entertainments are made. Taylor. DI'NNER. s. diner, Fr. The chief meal; the meal eaten about the middle of the day. Taylor. DI'NNER-TIME. s. dinner and time. The lime of dining. DINT. s. oync, Sax. i. A blow; a stroke. Milton. a. The mark made by a blow. Dryden. 3. Violence; force; power. Addison. To DINT. p. a. from the noun. To mark with...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 464 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 24mm | 821g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236596021
  • 9781236596024