A Dictionary of Chemistry and Mineralogy; With an Account of the Processes Employed in Many of the Most Important Chemical Manufactures to Which Are Added a Description of Chemical Apparatus, and Various Useful Tables of Weights Volume 2

A Dictionary of Chemistry and Mineralogy; With an Account of the Processes Employed in Many of the Most Important Chemical Manufactures to Which Are Added a Description of Chemical Apparatus, and Various Useful Tables of Weights Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1807 edition. Excerpt: ...two latter nearly equally. When an alkaline hydro-sulphuret is added to any earthy salt, (those of alumine and zircon excepted) no preci pitat'nn takes place, either because no decomposition occurs, or because the new compounds are equally soluble with the former. The solutions of alumine and zircon, however, are precipitated by the alkaline hydro-sulphurets, as well as all the metallic salts. The action of the alkaline hydro-sulphurets on metallic salts will be afterwards mentioned. Sulphurets or Hepars, Liver -f Sulphur. Sulfure of Berthollet, and other French chemists. When sulphur is melted with an alkali a brown uniform mass is produced, which as long as it continues dry is a simple combination of sulphur and alkali. But while dissolving in water a certain quantity of sulphuretted hydrogen is immediately generated, which remains in the solution and unites with the sulphur and alkali, but may be expelled by the addition of an acid, which at the same time precipitates the greater part of the sulphur in a state of purity. The liquid sulphurets therefore contain sulphur, alkali or" alkaline earth, and sulphuretted hydrogen, so that they differ from the hydro-sulphurets of the fame bases in containing a large excess of sulphur, and therefore give with acids a copious precipitate of sulphur, which the simple hydro-sulphurets do not. Berthollet considers the sulphuretted hydrogen in the liquid alkaline sulphurets as the intermede by which the sulphur is dissolved in the alkali, and therefore as an essential part of the compound, and he denies the possibility of a liquid sulphuret existing without containing sulphuretted hydrogen in its composition. Hence he terms these compounds Sulfures Hydrogenis, which Mr. Chenevix calls Hydroguretted...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 570 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 29mm | 1,002g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123660251X
  • 9781236602510