A Dictionary of American and English Law; With Definitions of the Technical Terms of the Canon and Civil Laws. Also, Containing a Full Collection of Latin Maxims, and Citations of Upwards of Forty Thousand Reported Cases in Volume 1

A Dictionary of American and English Law; With Definitions of the Technical Terms of the Canon and Civil Laws. Also, Containing a Full Collection of Latin Maxims, and Citations of Upwards of Forty Thousand Reported Cases in Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...leather. CTJSTUMA PARVA ET NOVA--The alien's duty on imported and exported commodities. Cot, (in the sense of wound, defined). 3 La. Ann. 512. Cut Glass, (in customs law). 12 How. (TJ. S.) 9, 20. CUTHRED.--A knowing or skillful counsellor. Cutting, (in criminal statute). 1 Buss. & Ry. C. C. 104. CTJTPTJRSE.--One who steals by the method of cutting purses; a common practice when men wore their purses at their girdles, as was once the custom. CUTTER OP THE TALLIES.--An officer in the Exchequer, to whom it belonged to provide wood for the tallies, and to cut the sum paid upon them, &c CYCLE.--A measure of time; a space in which the same revolutions begin again; a periodical space of time.--Encyc. Lond. Cyder, (defined). 5 Barn. & C. 628, 636; 8 Howl. & Ey. 403, 413. CYNE-BOT, or CYNE-GILD.--The portion belonging to the nation of the mulct for slaying the king, the other portion or wdr being due to his family.--Blount. CYPHONISM.--A punishment used by the ancients, which some suppose to have been the smearing of the body with honey, and exposing the person to flies, wasps, &c. But the author of the notes on Hesychius says, under the word ZjJtpuiV, that it is derived from the word ZjJTZTW, to bend or stoop, And signifies that kind of punishment still used by the Chinese, called by Sir George Staunton "the wooden collar," by which the neck of the malefactor is bent or weighed down.--Encyc. Lond.;) Wharton. CY-PRES.--Evidently from the French rior cy, "this" or "here." and pn-, "near," although the phrase does not Beem to occur in French. $ 1. Where a person has expressed a general intention and also a particular mode in wKich he wishes it carried out, but the intention cannot be carried...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 548 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 28mm | 966g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236554604
  • 9781236554604