Diary of the Times of Charles the Second by the Honourable Henry Sidney, (Afterwards Earl of Romney) Including His Correspondence with the Countess of Sunderland, and Other Distinguished Persons at the English Court; To Which Are Added,

Diary of the Times of Charles the Second by the Honourable Henry Sidney, (Afterwards Earl of Romney) Including His Correspondence with the Countess of Sunderland, and Other Distinguished Persons at the English Court; To Which Are Added,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...in 1706, he was created Earl Godolphin. He was removed from his office of Lord High Treasurer in 1710, and died two years afterwards. Bishop Burnet says "that he was the silentest and modestest man who was perhaps ever bred in a court. He had a clear apprehension, and despatched business with great method, and with so much temper that he had no personal enemies. But his silence begot a jealousy which hung long upon him. His notions were for the Court, but his incorrupt and sincere way of managing the concerns of the Treasury created in all people a very high esteem for him. He loved gaming the most of any man of business I ever knew, and gave one reason for it, because it delivered him from the obligation to talk much. He had true principles of religion and virtue, and never heaped up wealth. So that, all things laid together, he was one of the worthiest and wisest men who was employed The truth is, here is very little matter for a letter, and no discourse but of elections, who is like to in that age."--Chalmers' Univ. Biog. Subsequent discoveries, by which it appears that Godolphin, whilst in the service of his master, William HI., kept up a correspondence with James, would have probably induced Burnet to qualify this high praise. Godolphin and Evelyn were great friends. There is a curious letter written by Evelyn to Godolphin when he was first Commissioner of the Treasury, in 1696, in which he touches upon matters not a little interesting in the present day. Amongst many suggestions there offered, he says, "There is certainly wanting a Council of Trade.... composed of a wise, publique-spirited, active, and noble President, a select number of Assessors, sober, industrious, and dextrous men, of consummate experience in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236902505
  • 9781236902504