Diary Illustrative of the Times of George the Fourth; Interspersed with Original Letters from the Late Queen Caroline and from Various Other Distingui

Diary Illustrative of the Times of George the Fourth; Interspersed with Original Letters from the Late Queen Caroline and from Various Other Distingui

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...beyond measure. I am to meet the authoress, Mrs. Brunton, to-night; but I am told she has no conversational powers. I have lately had the advantage of becoming acquainted with Mr. J; he has reviewed Waverley, and given it high praise, and ends by desiring Walter Scott, if he is not the author, to look well to his laurels, for that ho has got a much more powerful opponent than any who have yet entered the lists with him. The Lord of the Isles is a charming work, and so esteemed in this town. I hear it is so everywhere. I heard to-day, in the way of gossip, that the Duke of B has run off with a beauty from Brighton; but that none of the Ladies have had any thoughts of eloping--only one of them is to be married to Lord A. Sir 11. M y's letters are published, and never was such stuff read. Surely it is a very bad trade to write love-letters. And now I must bid you adieu. "Yours, etc." November 5th.--I went to see a nun lake-the black veil, or inviolable vow. The ceremony was Ion," as the bishop performed mass, which is the only difference between the forms of a noviciate and a professed nun. It is a solemn ceremony, and must be dreadful when the vows are constrained. In this instance the young woman appeared (o go through it with the utmost composure, and read her engagements wiih a clear steady voice. She was only three-and-lwenty I was informed; and, though not handsome, very pleasing in her appearance. To my feelings, the prospect of a convent life is, without exception, the most melancholy fate; to be buried alive is another word for the same thing. Mr. and Mrs. S are arrived; they are not suited to any place but London, or any society but their own narrow circle of acquaintance. They wearied me for an hour by grumbling at the want...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236527062
  • 9781236527066