Diary and Correspondence of Samuel Pepys, with a Life and Notes by Richard Lord Braybrooke, Deciphered, with Additional Notes, by M. Bright

Diary and Correspondence of Samuel Pepys, with a Life and Notes by Richard Lord Braybrooke, Deciphered, with Additional Notes, by M. Bright

By (author) 

List price: US$23.46

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1877 edition. Excerpt: ...were very pretty. 1 Her Majesty's apartments, at Whitehall Palace. 2 See 27th Jan., ante. s See Dec. 1, 1666, ante. 19th. To the office, where all the morning doing little business, our want of money being so infinite great. At noon home, and there find old Mr. Michell and Howlett come to desire mine and my wife's company to dinner to their son's, and so away by coach with them, it being Betty's wedding-day a year, as also Shrove Tuesday. Here I made myself mighty merry, and a mighty pretty dinner we had in this little house, to my exceeding great content, and my wife's, and my heart pleased to see Betty. After dinner I fell to read the Acts about the building of the City again; and indeed the laws seem to be very good, and I pray God I may live to see it built in that manner! This morning I hear that our discourse of peace is all in the dirt; for the Dutch will not like of the peace, or at least the French will not agree to it; so that I do wonder what we shall do, for carry on the war we cannot. 20th. To White Hall, by the way observing Sir W. Pen's carrying a favour to Sir W. Coventry, for his daughter's wedding, and saying that there was others for us, when we will fetch them, which vexed me, and I am resolved not to wear it when he gives me one. His wedding hath been so poorly kept, that I am ashamed of it; for a fellow that makes such a flutter as he do. When we came to the Duke of York here, I heard discourse how Harris of his play-house is sick, and everybody commends him, and, above all things, for acting the Cardinall. They talked how the King's viallin, Bannister,1 is mad that the King hath a Frenchman1 come to be chief of some part of the King's musique, at which the Duke of York made great mirth. Then withdrew to his closett, where...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 146 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236549066
  • 9781236549068