Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn, to Which Is Subjoined the Private Correspondence Between King Charles I and Sir Edward Nicholas, and Between Sir Edward Hyde and Sir Richard Browne; Ed. from the Orig. Mss. at Wotton by Volume 4

Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn, to Which Is Subjoined the Private Correspondence Between King Charles I and Sir Edward Nicholas, and Between Sir Edward Hyde and Sir Richard Browne; Ed. from the Orig. Mss. at Wotton by Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...the letter you haue from our Master, will praeserue you from any affronts, and then sure your beinge ther will be at least for your owne aduantage, both to collecte what is dew to his Ma'y upon accounts,1 which must be worth somewhat, and will be easily discouer'd by what Mr. Holder hath receaued from the Duke, and to receaue the dewes upon ther last pryzes, which will, they say, amounte to a rounde summ.--Though Sr Geo. Carterett was gone out of the towne, when I receaued yours of the 10. yett very contrary to my expectation he returned hither 3 or 4 dayes after, and stayed only one night, when I shewed him your letter; sure he will do all the good offices to you in all thinges he is able. My Ld will obserue the caution you giue him, and will be gladd you can discouer any monyes to be dew to him, and. he will gladly giue you authority to receaue it; indeed a supply will come as seasonable to him as to any body, for when I haue told you, that none of us haue receaued a penny since you went, you will belieue our necessities to be importunate enough, which would be more insupportable, if wee did not see the King himselfe reduced to greater distresse then you can believe or imagyne. I perceaue the arrest of ffarrande, is upon some pique betweene the Duke of Vandosme and the Marshall Melleray,8 betweene whom the contests grew very high, and are like to breake out to such a degree that the Courte is not without apprehension, that it shall not conteyne them both to its seruice, and seemes at present, to be vnsatisfyed with the Marshall, and I heare some letters of reprehension are sent to him; therefore this arrest is not like to produce any aduantage to his Mat7, besides that it seemes the shipp is out of the power of the Marshall. I haue...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 170 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 313g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236875400
  • 9781236875402