Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn; To Which Is Subjoined the Private Correspondence Between King Charles I and Sir Edward Nicholas, and Between Sir Edward Hyde, Afterwards Earl of Clarendon, and Sir Richard Browne Volume 4

Diary and Correspondence of John Evelyn; To Which Is Subjoined the Private Correspondence Between King Charles I and Sir Edward Nicholas, and Between Sir Edward Hyde, Afterwards Earl of Clarendon, and Sir Richard Browne Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...many reasons, and the Kinge commanded me to aduise with Mr Atturny, and upon both our consideringe the case, as Mr Holder sent it me, wee doe not see it so cleerely stated, as to be able to giue the King any iudgement upon it, since it does not appeare that the goods do at all belonge to any English marchant or ffactor, but for ought appears may be the proper estate of the Hamberghers. I did not suppose they had suffred you to giue any adiudications ther, and that the former arrest had bene made at Rhemes upon that quarrell: We hope the Duke will be heare within 2 or 3 dayes, and then it will be necessary to receaue his derection upon all this businesse. My L4 Inchiquin and I are upon some trouble with your Landlord, who yesterday was at your house, and expresses some purpose to seize upon the goods; which we all vnderstande would not only be very mischieuous to you, but very dishonorable to the Kinge, and therefore you may be confident that wee omitt nothing that is in our power to doe, hauinge not a penny to discharge the debte. An extract from the Mercurius Politicus of the 8th July, 1652, may help to illustrate this letter: "Charles Stuart, who was said to be gone in our last from Paris went not till some few days after. He made the more haste, because a servant of his was fallen upon, pursued, and beaten, even in his master's place of abode at the Louvre. Hee also was besieged there by the bakers, butchers, and other tradesmen of all sorts, in whose books he is fain very deep; and they feared, if they lost him they should lose their money. But This day Sr Ri: ffoster goes with my Ld Inchiquin to him, to see how farr good wordes and promises will prevayle with him, and all other courses shall be really taken for his satisfaction, that...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 180 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 331g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236602943
  • 9781236602947