Diaries and Correspondence of James Harris, First Earl of Malmesbury, Containing an Account of His Missions to the Court of Madrid, to Frederick the Great, Catherine the Second, and at the Hague; And of His Special Missions to Volume 4

Diaries and Correspondence of James Harris, First Earl of Malmesbury, Containing an Account of His Missions to the Court of Madrid, to Frederick the Great, Catherine the Second, and at the Hague; And of His Special Missions to Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...talked of himself and his Government; said he did not care what was said of it, provided it was not something base and degrading; he thought all common abuse not only fair, but flattering; that he however could not bear that persons absent should be committed, (and he alluded to Pitt, ) and this was a species of malignant opposition not to be endured. All this was aimed at Canning, and said to me purposely. When Addington left me, I called on Lord Pelham--conversed on the subject with him. On my return through St. J ames's Park, met Lord Chatham, walked with him; he said, after talking over the Message and Address, and in answer to my inquiry, that his brother (Mr. Pitt) was very well; that he was informed of all that was passing; would come up when it was time; that had he come to-day, besides the singularity of being in the House so very soon after he had asked for a month's absence, it would give to the measure too great an air of concert, weaken the support he might afford, and appear as if he was governing at a distance, and that the measure was his, not that of Government; besides, it would look too warlike, whereas the object 'was that it should be considered both here, and in Europe, as a step taken to prevent war. It was impossible to talk more wisely and clearly than Lord Chatham did. I asked him, how the present conduct of Russia struck him; whether it was to be looked upon as conveying a disposition to act in concert with us. No, he said, not that, but favourable; it seemed to hold out a menace to go to war with France, if France invaded the Morea, but not if hostilities broke out in consequence of any dispute between France and us. I said I was fearful, then, that too great a reliance was placed on Russia, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 158 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 295g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236989201
  • 9781236989208