The Devils and Evil Spirits of Babylonia; Being Babylonian and Assyrian Incantations Against the Demons, Ghouls, Vampires, Hobgoblins, Ghosts, and Kin

The Devils and Evil Spirits of Babylonia; Being Babylonian and Assyrian Incantations Against the Demons, Ghouls, Vampires, Hobgoblins, Ghosts, and Kin

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...lim-nu. 10 47,852 translates this line w-/i ru-hu-u ru-su-u up-sa-U-t mimma lim-nu," and for Uh (O-ri-a reads up (?)-a-ri-a. II 47,852, sa. "47,852 omits. Line doubtful. On the high road have attacked this man. 65. The man of Ea am I! The man of Damkina am I! The messenger of Marduk am I! To revive the ( )' sick man, 70. The great lord Ea hath sent me; He hath added his pure spell to mine, 75. He hath added his pure voice to mine, He hath added his pure spittle to mine, He hath added his pure prayer to mine. (plate III.) Though that which resteth on the body of the sick man 80. Had power to destroy temples, b Yet by the magic of the Word of Ea 85. These evil ones will be put to flight. The tamarisk,0 the powerful weapon of Anu, I 35,61 f, ni. 47.852. a-me-lu. Translated on 47,852... a-na-ku. 4 K. 224, be-lum; 35,611, be-...; 47,852, be-lu. S.996, //. '38,594. Na. 'S. 996, me's-ri-ti. 47,852, sa; S. 996, si. 47,852, Ea.,0 S.996, turn. II S. 996, si-ra. Russu. Possibly either for ru'ut-su (" his spittle ") or from the root ra'sdsu, which may perhaps be the Chaldee r'sas (Levy, Chald. WMerb., ii, 429) meaning "to smite." Neither are, however, probable. b S. 996 has mesriti, "limbs." 0 Eru (gis-ma-nu). From Zimmern's Rituallafeln, Nos. 46-47 (p. 156, 1. 15), VII salme eri, "Seven images of #r-wood," it is clear that this is a wood, and not a wooden object. It occurs frequently in these texts, and the best Semitic word to compare it with is the Syriac 'ara (Brockelmann, Lexicon, p. 259, a), "tamarisk." In my hands I hold. 90. May the god Dubsag-Unug-ki," the patron of Kullabi, For my life and health follow after me. A kindly Guardian marcheth on my right, A kindly...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236594878
  • 9781236594877