The Development of the Wealth of India; Reprint from MacMillan's Magazine, with Notes on the Different Administrative and Judicial Systeems Required for the Asiatic Races and the British Inhabitants

The Development of the Wealth of India; Reprint from MacMillan's Magazine, with Notes on the Different Administrative and Judicial Systeems Required for the Asiatic Races and the British Inhabitants

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ... civilized of the valley itself? 'They have not yet learned the value of a lie, ' said he, with the greatest simplicity and sincerity, for he was a very honest and plain'.spoken man." (Vol. ii. p. 110.) " I have had before me hundreds of cases in which a man's property, liberty, or life has depended upon his telling a lie, and he has refused to tell it to save either--as my friend told me, ' they had not learned the value of a lie, ' or rather, they had not learned with how much impunity a lie could be told in the tribunals of civilized society." (Vol. ii. p. 112.) The same ofiiccr was informed by an intelligent native landowner, that now " every man who has a cause in your civil courts seems to think it necessary either to swear falsely himself, or to get others to do it for him." (Id. p. 149.) The consequence is, that the "courts of justice are represented as so immoral, that they infuse a deeper stain of depravity into the Indian character, and corrupt beyond their usual pitch of wickedness the natives who approach them." (Mill, Hist. vol. V. p. 632.) "And it was not long before the more penetrating minds in the Indian service began to see that the evidence of witnesses in our courts was converted into an instrument in the hands of men, instead of being a source of truth."--Id. vol. v. p. 579. In 1812 the Directors found reason to express a fear that room might be given to raise a question whether it were not better to leave the natives to their own arbitrary and precipitate tribunals, than to harass their feelings and injure their property by an endless procrastination of their suits, under the pretence of more deliberate jnstice.--Id. vol. v. p....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236896807
  • 9781236896803