The Development of American Thought

The Development of American Thought

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1893 edition. Excerpt: ...the literary conditions which he shared. Of British parentage (his father Scotch and his mother English), he was born in New York in the year of the treaty of peace between England and the United States, after the Revolution. The first conspicuous American author was neither a Puritan nor a Southron; the local tone of his American writings is that of New York City and the Hudson. His religious element, so far as it exists, is that of placid, oldfashioned Episcopacy, undisturbed by modern thought " or any special idea of progress. The American elements of vigor, push, independence, high creative ambition, are lacking in Irving the author, as they were lacking in Irving the man. In literature and in life he was the genial conservative. Washington blessed " his namesake in New York, when Irving was a baby; and the Washingtonian courtesy and contented reserve always characterized Irving, without the dogged and self-reliant persistency of the first President. Irving's education was obtained neither at Harvard nor Yale; and his parents did not choose to His Em). send him, perhaps against his will, to Colum-Days bia, the college of his brothers, --then, as now, virtually an advanced school for New Yorkers only. He was a great reader, and duly went to school, but the culture he afterward showed so conspicuously in his writings was self-acquired--as indeed all culture must be. He early began to scribble, both in prose and verse; literary precocity was then common; but his first writings were less meritorious than those of Bryant and Longfellow, both of whom were brilliant boys. Irving, like Bryant and Longfellow, thought to study law, but the unwise intention was soon abandoned. Peter Irving, his brother, was the editor of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 277g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236641531
  • 9781236641533