Developing Therapeutics for Alzheimer's Disease
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Developing Therapeutics for Alzheimer's Disease : Progress and Challenges

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Description

Developing Therapeutics for Alzheimer's Disease: Progress and Challenges provides a thorough overview of the latest advances toward the development of therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease, along with the major hurdles that still must be overcome and potential solutions to these problems. Despite the lack of progress toward developing therapeutics that can slow or stop the progression of this disease, important discoveries have been made and many promising approaches are advancing in preclinical studies and clinical trials. This book outlines the special challenges related to specific targets and approaches, while presenting a realistic, comprehensive and balanced view of drug discovery and development in this area.

Written by international leaders in the field, the book assesses prospects for the emergence of effective agents and allows readers to better understand the challenges, failures, and future potential for research in Alzheimer's disease. This book is a valuable resource to academic scientists carrying out translational research in Alzheimer's disease, industrial scientists engaged in Alzheimer's drug discovery, executives in biopharmaceutical companies making strategic decisions regarding the direction of internal research and potential outside partnerships, and graduate-level students pursuing courses on Alzheimer's therapeutics.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 676 pages
  • 191 x 235 x 27.94mm | 1,520g
  • Academic Press Inc
  • San Diego, United States
  • English
  • 012802173X
  • 9780128021736
  • 1,776,756

Table of contents

1. The Complex Pathways to Mechanism-Based Therapeutics in Alzheimer's Disease
2. The Genetic Basis of Alzheimer's Disease
3. B-Secretase Inhibition
4. Y-Secretase Inhibitors: from Chemical Probes to Drug Development
5. Therapeutic Targeting of AB42
6. Modulators of Amyloid B-Protein (AB) Self-Assembly
7. Anti-Amyloid-B Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's Disease
8. Targeting AB Receptors to Modify Alzheimer's Disease Progression
9. Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Alzheimer's Amyloid B-Peptide
10. Alzheimer's Disease Therapeutics Targeting Apolipoprotein E
11. Microtubule Stabilization
12. Tau Phosphorylation as a Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease
13. Stimulation of Tau Degradation
14. Passive Immunotherapy for Tau Pathology
15. Inhibition of Tau Aggregation as a Basis for Treatment and Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease
16. Neuroprotective Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease Prevention and Therapy
17. Symptomatic Cognitive Enhancing Agents
18. Tackling Alzheimer's Disease by Targeting Oxidative Stress and Mitochondria
19. Preclinical and Clinical Issues in Alzheimer Drug Development
20. Molecular Imaging in Alzheimer Clinical Trials
21. Fluid Biomarkers and Diagnostics
22. Non-Pharmacologic Activity Interventions to Prevent Alzheimer's Disease
23. Prospects and Challenges for Alzheimer Therapeutics
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About Michael S. Wolfe

Michael S. Wolfe is Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital. He received his B.S. in chemistry in 1984 from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science and Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry in 1990 from the University of Kansas. After postdoctoral stints at the University of Kansas (medicinal chemistry) and the NIH (cell biology), he joined the faculty of the University of Tennessee in Memphis in 1994. In 1999, he moved to Harvard Medical School, where his work has focused on understanding the molecular basis of Alzheimer's Disease and related disorders, and identifying effective approaches for pharmacological intervention. Awards for his work include the Sato Memorial International Award in bioorganic and medicinal chemistry from the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan (2003), the MetLife Award for Biomedical Research (2008), a Zenith Fellows Award from the Alzheimer's Association (2008), and the Potamkin Prize from the American Academy of Neurology (2009).
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