Designing Heating and Ventilating Systems; The Practical Application of the Engineering Rules and Formulas in Every Day Use, in Laying Out Steam, Hot Water, Furnace and Ventilating Equipment for Buildings of All Kinds, Presented in a

Designing Heating and Ventilating Systems; The Practical Application of the Engineering Rules and Formulas in Every Day Use, in Laying Out Steam, Hot Water, Furnace and Ventilating Equipment for Buildings of All Kinds, Presented in a

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...It is, therefore, advantageous where possible to use comparatively low velocities. The main duct is sometimes made the same size as the outlet of the fan and is decreased in size as the branches are taken off. This method will be found to give rather high velocities. The best results will be obtained if the velocity in the main duct does not exceed 1500 ft. per minute. For factory work this figure can be safely adopted as a standard for the first part of the system from the outlet of the fan to the first branch duct. At this point the velocity in the main duct should be decreased 50 to 75 ft. per minute depending upon the distance between this and the succeeding outlet. The velocity should be decreased in this manner and at about this same proportion at each outlet from the main duct. This will gradually decrease the loss in friction and at the same time increase the static pressure and thus produce the same flow of air from the outlets at the extreme ends of the duct as from those nearer the fan. The velocity in the branch ducts should be decreased as soon as they leave the main duct. The velocity at the outlet into the room should not exceed 600 ft. per minute, and if in any case the air blows directly upon the occupants of the room, the velocity should not be more than 400 ft. per minute. In all duct work deflectors with indicating quadrants should be installed at all division points and butterfly or volume dampers should be installed near the outlet of each branch. Problem Design the duct system for a building 225 ft. long by 100 ft. wide, with a 30 ft. ceiling. The building to have four air changes per hour. The fan to be located at one end of the building and one main rectangu'ar duct to be carried down the center of the building, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123690852X
  • 9781236908520