Descriptive Portraiture of Europe in Storm and Calm; Twenty Years' Experiences and Reminiscences of an American Journalist

Descriptive Portraiture of Europe in Storm and Calm; Twenty Years' Experiences and Reminiscences of an American Journalist

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...people were so thoroughly convinced of the truth of what they said that there was no reasoning with them. I reached the Northern rail way station without adventure, and walked down to my apartments in the Rue des Petits Champs without seeing any evidence whatever of the insurrection, except the cannon grinning from the barricades in the Place Vend6me. Paris was for six weeks thereafter, with the exception of an occasional cannonade and a pretty constant clatter of musketry at a distance, more tranquil that it usually is in spring and early summer. Presently the situation was clearly defined. Versailles had determined to besiege and take the rebels of the capital at no matter what cost of blood and treasure. M. Thiers was in an angry mood, which was not at all softened by the decrees of the Commune against him and the unroofing of his house in the Place St. Georges. The new masters of Paris, the citizens, as they called them selves, were quite free and easy in their communications with strangers, and many of the simple workmen, carrying guns, standing sentries in the Rue de la Paix and on the central boulevards, disclosed what they thought were the plans of the Commune to English and American people, and possibly even to Prussians, without the slightest reserve. The officers, however, in time forbade conversation; but the men only obeyed when the officers were in sight. The vimndi&res were not the least amusing of the odd features of the Communal military forces. They were usually women of middle age, scarcely to be classed as handsome, clad in brown habits, and wearing bonnets which were a kind of compromise between a Phrygian cap and a Tam O'Shanter. They excited much sport during the first days'of the Commune, before the young fashionables...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 424 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 753g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236635957
  • 9781236635952