A Descriptive and Historical Account of Hydraulic and Other Machines for Raising Water; Ancient and Modern with Observations on Various Subjects Connected with the Mechanic Arts Including the Progressive Development of the Steam Engine

A Descriptive and Historical Account of Hydraulic and Other Machines for Raising Water; Ancient and Modern with Observations on Various Subjects Connected with the Mechanic Arts Including the Progressive Development of the Steam Engine

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...was enormously beyond what was required for the purpose effected. It has 298 American Water-works. Book IIL been estimated that 95 per cent of the power was expended in communicating motion to the apparatus! The evil of working the pumps with shafts and chains at such great distances from the power, was seen a few years after the machine was completed. In 1738 an attempt was made by M. Camus to raise the water to the reservoir by a single lift. The attempt succeeded but partially, and the machine was much strained by the extraordinary effort, chiefly because only a small portion of the power was used; viz: those wheels that raised the water into the first cistern; the others which moved the shafts and chains abovementioned, not being applicable for the purpose. But even this comparatively small power forced the water to the reservoir, and thus demonstrated the practicability of completing the work at one throw, if the whole apparatus had been adapted accordingly, ffothing more was done for nearly forty years, and the machine proceeded as before till 1775, when another trial was made to raise the water only to the second cistern: this succeeded, and it was then hoped that the first cistern would be dispensed with; but many of the old pipes burst from the undue strain upon them, financial difficulties impeded their renewal, and the old plan was once more resorted to. The water wheels at last fell into decay and were replaced by a steam engine, of sixty-four horse power, by order of Napoleon; but the old shafts, chains, pipes and cisterns, &c. still remain. We have mentioned only 225 pumps, but there were in all upwards of 250; some being feeders to others, and to keep water always over the pistons of those near the river. As each pump had two...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 364 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 649g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236654773
  • 9781236654779