A Descriptive and Historical Account of Hydraulic and Other Machines; Or Raising Water, Ancient and Modern with Observations on Various Subjects Connected with the Mechancis Arts

A Descriptive and Historical Account of Hydraulic and Other Machines; Or Raising Water, Ancient and Modern with Observations on Various Subjects Connected with the Mechancis Arts

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 edition. Excerpt: ...improve on; but the description sufficiently indicates that similar machines were in actual use.b The materials and workmanship of the pumps--metallic pistons and spindle valves, with guards to prevent the latter from opening too far; the mode of forming the goose-neck by a kind of swivel joint, somewhat like the union or coupling screw; the application of an air vessel; two pumps forcing water through one pipe, and both worked by a double lever, are proofs tiiat the machine described by Heron was neither an ideal one, nor of recent origin or use. There are features in it that were very slowly developed oy manufacturers in modern times. It is not at all improbable that ancient engines were equal in effect to the best of ours; but, whether they were or not, one thing is certain, that to the ancients belongs the merit of discovering the principles employed in these machines and of applying them to practice. It is remarkable too, that fire engines made their first appearance in Egypt, thus adding another to the numerous obligations under which that wonderful country has placed civilized nations in all times to come. Having noticed the use of pumps to extinguish fires' in ancient warfare, we may remark that they were also employed in, the middle ages, if not before, to promote conflagrations, viz: to lanch streams of Greek fire. This rr.ysterious substance is represented as a liquid: Ueckman says it certa: nlv was one; and so far from being quenched, its violence was augt.-ented by contact with water. It was principally employed in naval combats, being enclosed in jar? lhat were thrown into the hostile vessels. It was also blown through iron and copper tubes planted "n the prows of galleys and fancifully shaped like the mouths of animals, which...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 356 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 635g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236580265
  • 9781236580269