Democracy in the United States; What It Has Done, What It Is Doing, and What It Will Do Volume 3

Democracy in the United States; What It Has Done, What It Is Doing, and What It Will Do Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ... tax to their bills and collect it in defiance of the State law. The same is true in relation to omnibus fares. If Congress, under the taxing power, can nullify State laws and other contracts in small matters, they can in large. If the power exists, there can be no limit to its exercise, nor any restriction as to the contracts and laws that shall be nullified or changed. The principle upon which this legislation rests is broad enough to enable Congress to control all State laws and all transactions of the people. If this be so, then we live under a government where all power rests, in the estimation of Congress, in its sovereign will, which is the definition of a plural tyranny. The enactments to which we have referred are not only unconstitutional both in form and substance, but they are antiDemocratic in principle. They are not equal in their operation, and only protect the few in the favored quarters and are oppressive in others. They do not permit mankind to seek happiness in their own way, but they exact of some and confer what is thus exacted upon others. One man is compelled to pay the Government three cents per pound on the cotton he produces, and the Government pays it out to another for manufacturing and exporting it. If a man has made a contract that is diminished in value by the act of the Government, instead of the latter indemnifying him, the other party to the contract is compelled to bear all the loss. If gas and other companies have charters, which the act of the Government has rendered unprofitable, instead of relieving them from the consequences of its acts, Congress throws the whole upon the other party. Such legislation cannot be defended by those who believe in equality of rights and privileges. These instances of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 158 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 295g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236653521
  • 9781236653529