The Deipnosophists or Banquet of the Learned of Athenaeus; With an Appendix of Poetical Fragments, Rendered Into English Verse by Various Authors and a General Index

The Deipnosophists or Banquet of the Learned of Athenaeus; With an Appendix of Poetical Fragments, Rendered Into English Verse by Various Authors and a General Index : In Three Volumes Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ... had accomplished his labours, when Eurystheus was solemnizing some sacrificial feast, he also was invited. And when the sons of Eurystheus were setting before each one of the company his proper portion, but placing a meaner one before Hercules, Hercules, thinking that he was being treated with indignity, slew three of the sons, Perimedes, Eurybius, and Eurypylus." But we are not so irascible, even though in all other points we are imitators of Hercules. 47. For lentils are a tragic food, said Archagathus.... to have written; which also Orestes ate when he had recover'd from his sickness, as Sophilus the comic writer says. But it is a Stoic doctrine, that the wise man will do everything well, and will be able to cook even lentils cleverly. On which account Timon the Phliasian said--And a man who knows not how to cook a lentil wisely. As if a lentil could not be boiled in any other way except according to the precepts of Zeno, who said--Add to the lentils a twelfth part of coriander. And Crates the Theban said--Do not prefer a dainty dish to lentils, And so cause factious quarrels in our party.' And Chrysippus, in his treatise on the Beautiful, quoting some apophthegms to us, says--Eat not an olive when you have a nettle; But take in winter lentil-macaroni--Bah! bah! Lentil-macaroni's like ambrosia in cold weather. And the witty Aristophanes said, in his Gerytades--You're teaching him to boil porridge or lentil. And, in his Amphiaraus--You who revile the lentil, best of food. And Epicharmus says, in his Dionysi--And then a dish of lentils was boil'd up. And Antiphanes says, in his Women like one another--Things go on well. Do you now boil some lentils, Or else at least now teach me who you are. And I know that a sister of Ulysses, the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 196 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 358g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236568117
  • 9781236568113