Dedication of the State Library Building at Concord

Dedication of the State Library Building at Concord

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...that in the coming years its interests will always find as intelligent and faithful guardians as those who are to-day represented by their president, whom I now have the pleasure of introducing to you, --Mr. Gilmore of Manchester. REMARKS BY HON. GEORGE C. GILMORE IN BEHALF OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE STATE LIBRARY. Little, I apprehend, is expected of the local management in the exercises of to-day, our duties being all of the future, and it would certainly be presumption on my part to attempt to interest this large audience by anything I might say, especially so when our distinguished guests are waiting on the platform to be heard, ---men who have given a life time to library management. But I cannot forbear saying a few words to place on record the early efforts of the inhabitants of the towns in this state to establish libraries. Dover is undoubtedly entitled to the honor of having been the first in the list, as early as July, I776, although the charter for her social library was not granted until December I8, I792; Rochester's social library chartered February I4, I794; Portsmouth's and Tamworth's both the same date, June I4, I796, the above being the first four charters granted; from I792 to I800, sixty, and from I801 to I883, one hundred and eighty-seven, making a total of two hundred and forty-seven, and at the present time only sixty towns are without a library. The petitioners for the social library of Tamworth present the advantages of a library as follows: "Whereas a general diffusion of useful knowledge in a land of liberty has a happy tendency to preserve freedom, and make better men and better citizens." The first absolutely free public library is supposed to be that of the town of Peterborough, in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236837525
  • 9781236837523