Decisions of the Right Honourable Charles Shaw Lefevre, Speaker of the House of Commons, on Points of Order, Rules of Debate, and the General Practice of the House

Decisions of the Right Honourable Charles Shaw Lefevre, Speaker of the House of Commons, on Points of Order, Rules of Debate, and the General Practice of the House

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ... the same after the clerk; the clerk then proceeded to administer the oath of abjuration, which the Baron de Rothschild repeated after the clerk as far as the words " upon the true faith of a Christian;" but upon the clerk reading those words, Baron de Rothschild said, "I omit those words as not binding on my conscience;" he then concluded with the words "So help me God " (the clerk not having read those words to him), and kissed the said-Testament. VVhereupon he was directed to withdraw. Mr. Hume rose to order, contending that the Honourable Member had taken the oaths, and concluded by moving that the Honourable Member do take his seat. Mr. Speaker.--The Honourable Member rose to order, and he cannot propose that motion. I directed the Honourable Member for the city of London to retire, because he did not take the words in the last oath which are prescribed by the Act of Parliament. I therefore desired the Honourable Member to withdraw, in order that the House might come to a decision upon the case. A Member, who had taken the Oaths of Allegiance, Supremacy and Abjuration, in the form most binding on his conscience, signed and left on the Table of the House a Paper containing the Oath of Abjuration, omitting a Passage to which he objected, and which he had omitted on taking the Oath: --Decided, that no notice of this Paper should be taken in the Votes, the Paper not having been prepared by the Clerk of the House, and being therefore irregular. Mr. J. A. Smitk said, that the Honourable Member ' for London came to the table of the House the other day, and took the oaths in the form which was most binding on his conscience, and that, having done so, he signed, in accordance with the Act of Parliament, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 138 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 259g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236781848
  • 9781236781840