The Debates of the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution; As Recommended by the General Convention at Philadelphia in 1787

The Debates of the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution; As Recommended by the General Convention at Philadelphia in 1787 : Together with the Journal of the Federal Convention, Luther Martin's Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...led him, he said, into deep meditation on it, and he would candidly state the result. A distinction had been set up, and urged, between the Northern and Southern States. He had hitherto considered this doctrine as heretical. He still thought the distinction groundless. He sees, however, that it is_ persisted in; and the southern gentlemen will not be satisfied unless they see the way open to their gaining a majority in the public councils. The consequence of such a transfer of power from the maritime to the interior and landed interest, will, he foresees, be such an oppression to commerce, that he shall be obliged to vote for the vicious principle of equality in the second branch, in order to pro vide some defence for the Northern States against it. But, to come _ more to the point--either this distinction is fictitious or real; if fictitious, let it be dismissed, and let us proceed with due confidence. If it be real, instead of attempting to blend incompatible things, let us at once take a friendly leave of each other. There can be no end of demands for security, if every particular interest is to be entitled to it. The Eastern States may claim it for their fishery, and for other objects, as the Southern States claim it for their peculiar objects. In this struggle between the two ends of the Union, what part ought the Middle States, in point of policy, to take? To join their eastern brethren, according to his ideas. If the Southern States get the power into their hands, and be joined, as they will be, with the interior country, they will inevitably bring on a war with Spain for the Mississippi. This language is already held. The interior country, having no property nor interest exposed on the sea, will be little affected by such a war....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 398 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 708g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236742370
  • 9781236742377