A Debate at a General Court of Proprietors of East-India Stock, on Wednesday the 24th of March, 1813, for Taking Into Consideration the Propositions

A Debate at a General Court of Proprietors of East-India Stock, on Wednesday the 24th of March, 1813, for Taking Into Consideration the Propositions

By (author) 

List price: US$15.84

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1813 edition. Excerpt: ...afterwards that their golden-prospects were imaginary. If, . therefore, the Company were only called upon, to concede and grant to them, a participation, ir the trade, which was admitted to be unimportant, not only by many of the East-India Proprietors, but even by some of the Honourable Directors themselves, who stated in their evidence that they were not afraid of an open trade, and that they were contented to grant to the Outports a participation in those commercial advantages: ---. If, therefore, this was admitted, there could be no difficulty whatever in adjusting so important a point: --beside which, there was this fact admitted even by the Company, that they could then afford to trade at 15 percent, lower than they had hitherto been able to do. If this was the fact, which he would not deny, as it was admitted on their own shewing, he was at a loss to conceive what difficulty there could be in conceding to the merchants of the Outports a small portion of the import trade. For his own part, he thought, so far should the Court be from shewing any disposition of unwillingness to treat with the Government upon this point, they ought to come forward and shew every possible disposition to meet his Majesty's Ministers, and say to them--" We have done all in our power to meef your views: --we have left no argument untried t we have stated every thing that occurs to us upon, the subject of our own interests, and the danger of an innovation on our privileges; but if you think it is of advantage to the country that we should admit the Outports to a participation in pur import trade--we, who are equally anxious fof'the welfare of our country--consent to give up such portion of our privileges as you may think conducive to that advantage. If...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236601912
  • 9781236601919