Davis's Manual of Magnetism; Including Also Electro-Magnetism, Magneto-Electricity, and Thermo-Electricity. with a Description of the Electrotype Process. for the Use of Students and Literary Institutions. with 100 Original Illustrations

Davis's Manual of Magnetism; Including Also Electro-Magnetism, Magneto-Electricity, and Thermo-Electricity. with a Description of the Electrotype Process. for the Use of Students and Literary Institutions. with 100 Original Illustrations

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...it often makes one hundred or more revolutions in a second. In order that the motion of the wheel may raise the hammer, it is necessary to transmit the battery current so that the bar may rotate in the proper direction. 174. Electro-magnetic Seasons Machine. In the instrument shown in fig. 73, the revolving magnet A imparts motion to an astronomical machine, representing the rotation of the earth and moon round the sun. The earth and sun revolve round a common centre of motion near the latter, which is represented by a gilt ball S; the earth also rotates on its axis. The axis of the earth has its proper obliquity with respect to the ecliptic, and preserves its parallelism, pointing in the same direction during the whole revolution. These circumstances oc Fig. 73. casion the north pole to be inclined towards the sun in one half of the orbit, and the south pole in the other, the degree of inclination constantly varying. This, in the case of the real earth, is the cause of the variation of the seasons and of the unequal length of the day and night. The moon is also seen to I revolve around the earth, attending it in its course round the sun. 175. Double Revolving Magnet. In this instrument, represented in fig. 74, there are two semicircular electro-magnets of the same size, both of which have Fig. 74. freedom of motion. The lower semicircle is supported by a pivot entering the upright pillar below it; its own axis is hollowed to receive the pivot on which the upper semicircle revolves. At D, in the figure, is seen a contrivance for conveying the current in a constant direction, of the same kind as that applied to the Revolving Ring and Magnet, 166, and which therefore need not be again described. 176. Fig. 75 represents another form of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123661903X
  • 9781236619037