Danish Arctic Expeditions, 1605 to 1620; Introduction. a Report to King Christian IV on the Danish Expedition to Greenland, Under the Command of Capta

Danish Arctic Expeditions, 1605 to 1620; Introduction. a Report to King Christian IV on the Danish Expedition to Greenland, Under the Command of Capta

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ... decided to dispense with this process of ornamentation. On the Outward Voyage. Page 5 Munk brought his ships out of the harbour of Copenhagen on the 9th of May. He adds in the MS., "as that day was a Sunday," referring, no doubt, to a superstitious belief, still prevalent in many places, that Sunday is a lucky day for the commencement of any enterprise, just as Friday is still more generally considered unlucky. As the Sound is a narrow thoroughfare, sailing ships are often detained there by unfavourable winds; and this happened in Munk's case, so that a whole Page 6 week elapsed before he finally weighed anchor and left Elsinore on Sunday ti, e 16th. The correctness of this date is confirmed by the following entry in Christian the Fourth's diary for this year under that date: Seilede Enhiorningen 0 Lamprenen paa den Seilads norden om. Den Almcegtigste give det til Lykke1 Enhiorningen and Lamprenen sailed on the voyage round by the North. May the Almighty make it prosper). In spite, however, of a Sunday having been chosen both for the first and for the final start, it would not be surprising if many on board looked forward with misgivings, because they had not proceeded very far before one of the crew committed suicide--an event which many would look upon as a bad omen. Their course necessarily lay northwards as far as the Scaw, and after that westerly as far as Lindesnajs, the southernmost promontory of Norway, in lat. 5S from this point, their nearest 1 R. Nyerup, Kong Christian den Fjcrdes Dagbogcr (Copenhagen 1825), pp. 56-57. The passage is quoted, in German, by J. H. Schlegel, in his translation of X. Slange's History 0/Christian 1V, iii, p. 126. route would be through the channel between the Orkney and the Ref-t0 & 'Page of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 96 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579429
  • 9781236579423