Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol" the Ultimate Unauthorized and Independent Reading Guide

Dan Brown's "The Lost Symbol" the Ultimate Unauthorized and Independent Reading Guide : The Ultimate Unauthorized and Independent Reading Guide

3.94 (17 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

Dan Brown's 'The Lost Symbol' was the most anticipated novel of 2009, and was the literary event of the year. Alex Carmine examines all the themes in depth, and provides a chapter-by-chapter analysis of 'The Lost Symbol'. From Alex's assessment of the novel, it is very much apparent that Dan Brown has not only been adhering to his own formula, but that he has also been following Joseph Campbell's concept of the hero's journey. We know that Dan Brown likes to play with the names of his characters, so Alex explores these in great detail. In this way, Alex reveals the name of the real American family upon whom the Solomons are based. Alex also shows that, following its development within 'The Da Vinci Code', Dan Brown's still very much in tune with his 'sacred feminine' side, with his stunning representation of womb envy. Dan Brown's fascinating depiction of masculinity within this novel is studied too. In addition to this, Alex explores the literary devices that Dan Brown employs, and the magical sleights of hand that he uses to make the reader look the wrong way. Indeed, one of the main arguments in this book is that Dan Brown has hidden much of the true meaning of 'The Lost Symbol' behind various veils of allegory, much as the Masons do with regards to their secrets, and like the Symbologist Robert Langdon, Alex reveals these meanings to you. However, Dan Brown is an author who also likes to reward his readers, so Alex examines the clues about the novel that he disseminated prior to publication via Facebook and Twitter. Furthermore, Alex considers the various Masonic practices depicted within the novel, and bring to the fore the conspiracy theories that surround this mysterious fraternity. Alex Carmine's very close reading of the novel literally leaves no stone uncovered, and will transform your own interpretation of the text.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 156 pages
  • 149.86 x 226.06 x 12.7mm | 272.15g
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 0953317226
  • 9780953317226
  • 554,128

Review Text

Dan Brown's 'The Lost Symbol' was the most anticipated novel of 2009, and was the literary event of the year. Alex Carmine examines all the themes in depth, and provides a chapter-by-chapter analysis of 'The Lost Symbol'. From Alex's assessment of the novel, it is very much apparent that Dan Brown has not only been adhering to his own formula, but that he has also been following Joseph Campbell's concept of the hero's journey. We know that Dan Brown likes to play with the names of his characters, so Alex explores these in great detail. In this way, Alex reveals the name of the real American family upon whom the Solomons are based. Alex also shows that, following its development within 'The Da Vinci Code', Dan Brown's still very much in tune with his 'sacred feminine' side, with his stunning representation of womb envy. Dan Brown's fascinating depiction of masculinity within this novel is studied too. In addition to this, Alex explores the literary devices that Dan Brown employs, and the magical sleights of hand that he uses to make the reader look the wrong way. Indeed, one of the main arguments in this book is that Dan Brown has hidden much of the true meaning of 'The Lost Symbol' behind various veils of allegory, much as the Masons do with regards to their secrets, and like the Symbologist Robert Langdon, Alex reveals these meanings to you. However, Dan Brown is an author who also likes to reward his readers, so Alex examines the clues about the novel that he disseminated prior to publication via Facebook and Twitter. Furthermore, Alex considers the various Masonic practices depicted within the novel, and bring to the fore the conspiracy theories that surround this mysterious fraternity. Alex Carmine's very close reading of the novel literally leaves no stone uncovered, and will transform your own interpretation of the text.
show more

Rating details

17 ratings
3.94 out of 5 stars
5 47% (8)
4 12% (2)
3 29% (5)
2 12% (2)
1 0% (0)

Our customer reviews

This comprehensive guide to The Lost Symbol really explains a lot about the decisions Dan Brown made in his plotting of the novel. Alex Carmine's argument that Dan Brown is following the theory of The Hero's Journey makes a lot of sense in the context in the novel, and in this light, a great deal of the plot becomes a lot more profound and perverse (in a good way). Although The Lost Symbol has got a bit of a lukewarm reception at the moment, I am confident that through Alex Carmine's expert critique, readers will begin to appreciate a lot more of the complexity that Dan Brown has built into it. Just as The Empire Strikes Back took a while to emerge from the shadow of Star Wars: A New Hope, so I'm sure that via Alex Carmine's interpretation, The Lost Symbol will soon be seen as Dan Brown's most mature achievement in the wake of The Da Vinci Code. Alex Carmine's book is certainly the most serious literary analysis ever undertaken of Dan Brown's work, and is undeniably the most rewarding due to this. Since Alex's book contains a chapter-by-chapter analysis of The Lost Symbol, it's very easy to dip into while reading Dan Brown's novel. Alex Carmine is also a very witty and entertaining guide, who pokes fun at Dan Brown's mistakes as well as pointing out his many successes.show more
by Cherry Fox
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