Cyclopedia of Mechanical Engineering; A General Reference Work on Machine Shop Practice, Tool Making, Forging, Pattern Making, Foundry, Work, Metallurgy, Steam Boilers and Engines, Gas Producers, Gas Engines, Automobiles, Volume 4

Cyclopedia of Mechanical Engineering; A General Reference Work on Machine Shop Practice, Tool Making, Forging, Pattern Making, Foundry, Work, Metallurgy, Steam Boilers and Engines, Gas Producers, Gas Engines, Automobiles, Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ... in the moist steam = 11,076 + 35,952a;. Therefore, 11,076 + 35,952x = 45,324 35,952x = 34,248 x = 0.952 That is, every pound of moist steam contains.952 lb. dry steam and.048 lb. moisture; or we may say there was 4.8 per cent of priming. The formula may be derived by the following algebraic work: Total heat in bbl. after condensation = W /; Total heat in bbl. before condensation = w qt; Total heat brought over by steam = W q, --w ql; Heat of liquid in condensed steam = (IV. w) q; Latent heat in dry steam = x (W--w) r; Total heat in moist steam = x (W--iv) r + (W--w) q. Therefore, x (IF--w) r + (IV--w) q = W q2--w g; xr (W--w) = W q2--w ql--W q + w q; or, transposing to a more convenient form, _ w(q-gj-Ifr(?-?2) r (W-w) The use of this form of apparatus is not especially to be commended, for it is liable to error, and a slight discrepancy in the weights or the temperatures may cause a large error in the result. In the above calculations, no allowance is made for loss of heat through radiation. Separator Calorimeter. This instrument shown in Fig. 08, consists of a chamber A, into which is led a steam pipe D, bringing a sample of steam from the boiler or steam main. This pipe leads into an enlargement perforated with small holes, or into a chamber A as shown in Fig. 68. The calorimeter separates the moisture from the steam just as a steam separator does; and the exhaust, which is dry steam, passes out of the pipe P, wherein is inserted a diaphragm containing small orifices, by means of which the quantity of steam flowing out can be calculated by thermodynamic methods. The exhaust steam can, of course, be led to some form of condensing apparatus, and the condensation weighed, if desired. As the steam enters the calorimeter, the moisture is drawn...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236530160
  • 9781236530165