Cyclopedia of English Literature; A Selection of the Choicest Productions of English Authors. from Earliest to the Present Time, Connected by a Critical and Biographical History Volume 2

Cyclopedia of English Literature; A Selection of the Choicest Productions of English Authors. from Earliest to the Present Time, Connected by a Critical and Biographical History Volume 2

List price: US$87.16

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 edition. Excerpt: ...in Nature's school; Nature had blest her. A waking eye, a prying mind, A heart that stirs, a hard to bind, A hawk's keen eight ye cannot blind, Ye could not Hester. My sprightly neighbour 1 gone before To that unknown and silent shore, Shall we not meet, as heretofore, Some summer morning, When from thy cheerful eyes a ray Hath struck a bliss upon the day, A bliss that would not go away, A sweet fore-warning! The Old Familiar Faces. I have had playmates, I have had companions, In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days; All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I have been laughing, I have been carousing, Drinking late, sitting late, with my bosom cronies; All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I loved a love once, fairest among women; Closed are her doors on me, I must not see her; All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I have a friend, a kinder friend has no man; Like an ingrate I left my friend abruptly; Left him, to muse on the old familiar faces. Ghost-like I paced round the haunts of my childhood; Earth seemed a desert I was bound to traverse, Seeking to find the old familiar faces. Friend of my bosom, thou more than a brother, Why wert not thou bom in my father's dwelling! So might we talk of the old familiar laces--How some they have died, and some they bave left me, And some are taken from me; all are departed; All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. A Famcfu to Tobacco. May the Babylonish curse Straight confound my stammering verse, If I can a passage see In this word-perplexity, Or a fit expression find, Or a language to my mind (Still the phrase is wide or scant), To take leave of thee, Great Plant! Or in any terms relate Half my love, or half my hato: For I hate, yet love thee so, That, whichever thing I...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 832 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 42mm | 1,456g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236500849
  • 9781236500847