Cyclopedia of Civil Engineering; A General Reference Work on Surveying, Highway Construction, Railroad Engineering, Earthwork, Steel Construction, Specifications, Contracts, Bridge Engineering, Masonry and Reinforced Concrete, Volume 9

Cyclopedia of Civil Engineering; A General Reference Work on Surveying, Highway Construction, Railroad Engineering, Earthwork, Steel Construction, Specifications, Contracts, Bridge Engineering, Masonry and Reinforced Concrete, Volume 9

List price: US$9.56

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...been found to be most nearly attained when the bed width is made from 15 to 16 times the depth. In hillside excavation, the greater the proportion of depth to width, the less will be the cost of construction; and in rock and heavy material it is Fig. 13. Concrete Canal with Sloping Sides for Carrying Pumped Water in Kansas desirable to make the bottom width not greater than from 2 to 3 times the depth. The cross-section of a canal may be so designed that the water may be wholly in excavation, wholly in embankment, or partly in both. The conditions that govern the choice of one of these three forms, are dependent upon the alignment and grade of the canal, and upon the character of the soil. It may be desirable at times to keep the canal wholly in cut, provided the topography and consequent location will permit of it. For if the material of which the banks are constructed is light and porous, the water may filter through and stand in stagnant pools on the surface, causing unnecessary waste as well as unsanitary conditions. If the material is impervious and will form good, firm banks, it may be well to keep the canal in embankment where possible, although this may necessitate the expense of borrowing material. To reduce the cost of construction, it is desirable, where the location will permit, to keep a canal about half in cut and half in embankment, thus reducing to the minimum the amount of material to be handled. Most main canals follow the slope of the country in grade contours running around hillside or mountain slopes. In such cases it is necessary to build an embankment on one side only, when the cutting will be entirely on the upper side. If there is a gentle slope on the upper side, and consequently an embankment on that side, it is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 140 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 263g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236749219
  • 9781236749215