Cyclopedia of American Horticulture; Comprising Suggestions for Cultivation of Horticultural Plants, Descriptions of the Species of Fruits, Vegetables, Flowers, and Ornamental Plants Sold in the United States and Canada, Volume 1

Cyclopedia of American Horticulture; Comprising Suggestions for Cultivation of Horticultural Plants, Descriptions of the Species of Fruits, Vegetables, Flowers, and Ornamental Plants Sold in the United States and Canada, Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...produced only in connection with the maturing of flowers. This will lead to the conclusion that to produce the best cuttings, a separation of the culture for flowers and the culture for cuttings is the best solution. A cutting should have an average length of 4 inches, with at least 1-inch clean stem. When taken off close from the branch or stem out of the axil of a leaf, no further trimming of the heel is necessary except an occasional removing of some wood fibers that may adhere from the break. When the shoot is too long and demands a cut with the knife, the cut should be made at or right above a joint, so that the two leaves can be peeled off and leave a clean heel. If cut too high above a joint, the stem gets too hard; if below, the bark will be peeled off with the leaves, and gives occasion to rot. Leaves should be removed as far as the cutting is inserted in the sand, and the top of the leaves shortened, so as not to give too much surface to evaporation. The propagating bed should be filled with 3 inches of clean, sharp sand, not too coarse, and well packed. When the cuttings are to be inserted, a line should be drawn with a knife to the required depth of about 1 inch, the cutting inserted and the sand pressed on. A tile or brick bottom in the propagating bed is much superior to a common wooden bottom; it assures better drainage and less danger of fungus. The utmost cleanliness should be observed in a propagating house, and no decaying matter be allowed to lie around. Water is needed every two or three days when the bench has good drainage. The house should be shaded either from the outside with a whitewash of white lead and coal oil, or on the inside with a light white muslin. Ventilation is advisable whenever the temperature comes..show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 26mm | 898g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236864123
  • 9781236864123